Technology and Program Infrastructure

Develop a Wildland Fire Specific Information Technology Network

Develop and implement a Information Technology Network that supports the Wildland Fire Mission. There are too many barriers between the existing DOI and USDA infrastructures to properly implement systems that truly support the inter-agency community.

Submitted by (@setriplett)

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9 votes
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Technology and Program Infrastructure

Aircraft for the Future

With the aging Wildland Air Tanker Fleet, more of the USA sees the need not being met when current tankers become non air worthy. I believe this should be a National Fleet including Water Scooping CL-415's that are 'loaned' and managed by other Government agencies. MN DNR has two aging CL-215's that will never be replaced by the state. But it the Federal Government owned the planes, I believe MN would be interested ...more »

Submitted by (@robert.nelson)

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0 votes
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Technology and Program Infrastructure

Digital Spray Hose System

I am developing a spray hose system that has ball valves every 200 meters. These valves allow for enabling a water curtain in selected segments of a long hose lay. Each ball valve is operated by a digital network that runs on a wire pair embedded in the hoses. The spacing could be much more than 200 meters. The hose with embedded wire already exists from All American Hose. The Dir of Engineering at Hale Products has ...more »

Submitted by (@steve.shoap)

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0 votes
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Technology and Program Infrastructure

Tech Transfer

We need to come up with a practical system of tech transfer from the federal research arena to our folks on the ground inside the fed and out (state, private, local government)

Submitted by (@jim.brenner)

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9 votes
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Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

Organizational Border Theory

The geographical interface between different jurisdictions can prove to be complex places for initial attack. Cultural and technical differences between fire organizations often lead to delays and conflicts until truly common operations are established. We need to study human behavior with regard to these border response areas and develop pro active ways of developing seamless response to emergencies (in addition to ...more »

Submitted by (@mikebenefield1)

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4 votes
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Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

Fire Protection from the House out, rather than from the Wildland in

Research has clearly demonstrated that the most effective way to protect lives, property, and the natural environment from wildland fire is to focus directly on making communities more fire safe rather than spending millions of dollars clearing habitat far from assets at risk. This provides for long-term solutions rather than endlessly trying to modify the natural environment. Fuel treatments can provide some benefit, ...more »

Submitted by (@richardw.halsey)

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41 votes
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Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

WUI risk for all will just get bigger & worse unless land use planning changes

WUI, and exurban intermix areas will keep expanding as populations grow. Firefighters will protect lives and property in communities that haven't been built yet. Citizens and their local governments will determine (actively or by default) where and how fire safe they will be. Current research (cafiresci.org/wui) suggests specific ways to locate, plan, and construct new communities in order to reduce their exposure to ...more »

Submitted by (@robertstaylor)

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31 votes
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"Wild Card" Issues

Forest Plant Communities have different fire needs

Mixed Sierran Conifer forest has understory shrubs in healthy condition. Jeffrey Pine forest understory is dominated by grasses and annual forbs. Douglas Fir forests have dense understories of shrubs. Many shrubs and all annuals and many perennials are obligate seeders, not crown resprouters, and can be extirpated by frequent ground fires. In short, the relationship of fire to these different healthy forests is different, ...more »

Submitted by (@kaytaff)

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12 votes
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Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

Develop a set of common sense wildfire prevention ordinances

There is a need to look at ways to decrease the rising costs of wildfire suppression due to human caused ignitions that put communities and firefighters at risk. Some possible actions to explore include: 1. Implementing coordinated information and education sharing methods regarding successful state and local government community growth management planning and enforcement that results in sustainable wildfire risk reduction ...more »

Submitted by (@gamlam1107)

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17 votes
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Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

We need a Paradigm Shift: Prepare, Stay, and Defend as a viable option

The challenge of increased wildland fires impacting human communities requires a dramatic paradigm shift in how wildland urban interface (WUI) residents are viewed and what is expected of them. The failed paradigm of WUI residents as helpless victims of fire must be completely banished. In the new paradigm, WUI residents will be highly pro-active participants in protecting their homes and their lives. All WUI residents ...more »

Submitted by (@julierogers03)

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12 votes
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"Wild Card" Issues

Complete restructuring of forest and fire management is vital!

I am really distressed about the disconnect between forest ecology/fire ecology and the status quo of forest and fire management. These two professions work on the same issues yet worlds apart. Forest management must shift to creating more resilient ecosystems rather than waiting until there is a wildfire and sending in the cavalry. Fuels/forest management funding is constantly being cut, but wildfire may soon qualify ...more »

Submitted by (@sandra.rideouthanzak)

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26 votes
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"Wild Card" Issues

Single Species Management

Let get away from just using and targeting fire and fuels for single species management. Fire and fuels seems to be the last resort when we talk about how we do business on a day to day in the resource world. With this current single species management mandate we seem to be the lead. How many other single species mandates have been successful in our past?

Submitted by (@khoward)

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3 votes
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