Campaign: Future #3 – Resilient Landscapes

Healthy Future

- The agencies got wiser and more serious about educating the public and Congress for the long-term, rather than focusing on year-to-year funding issues. - Agencies engaged all sectors of society in supporting activities which lead to this healthy, rationale future. - Educated and every more vocal public began demanding more "fire prevention" (i.e. Rx fire) to check fire danger, perhaps even staging protests upon Congress, ...more »

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

What changes to strategy, organizational structure, capabilities, & infrastructure would be needed? :

- Need to place stronger decisionmakers and collaborators in senior leadership positions, so long-term decisions would be made across landscapes for the greatest good, rather than allowing in-fighting among various agencies.

- Fire leaders would need to match the "CEO" model of accountability and effectiveness, rather than the government bureaucrat or more protected "SES" model, which may mean changes to civil service benefits and retirement system.

-Organization would need to become more efficient and accountable, quasi-public, perhaps even running on some kind of profit model tied to mitigating large fire costs.

- Agency public affairs program would need to become more professionalized, transparent, and responsive; more integrated with leadership to provide more current and transparent information.

- Inventory and monitoring would no longer be optional, but required and integrated into every fire management plan and action.

- Rx fire and smoke management training would need to become requirements for all firefighters across all agencies, and the "fire manager" model would need to trump the "firefighter/solider" model of professsion.

- Private, NGO, and even volunteer/citizen firefighters would need to become more integrated into wildland fire and Rx fire projects.

What information could help mitigate the risks presented by this future? :

- Evaluative data on skills sets/tests for leaders with the requirements to lead collaborative

- What are the current training/qualification outputs from various agency and training centers, PTFC, NAFRI, etc.?

- Comprehensive fuels treatments, wildfire, and smoke history database for all lands across entire country.

- Public opinion and knowledge assessment data on levels of understanding on Rx, smoke, and risk issues

What information could help capitalize on opportunities presented by this future? :

- Where are the available sources/pools of most adequate leaders to manage this effort at high levels?

- Where are the best/most efficient sources of Rx fire and smoke training for large numbers that will be needed?

-Identification for training/qualifying volunteer/citizen fire managers to work at local/private levels.

- Polling/assessment of industry to identify where corporations/NGOs/others would be willing to bear costs (and gain public visibility) to support this future.

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Campaign: Future #2 – Super Fire Administration

Super Fire Administration

- A Congress that is increasingly divided and can only agree on simple, basic, short-term solutions in order to run the country. - Political interests/lobbyists protecting big business interests who pressure Congress to spend more and more money to protect their interests. - The reality of larger fires, climate change, public fears, and expectations the government must ensure safety and clean air at all times for all ...more »

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

What changes to strategy, organizational structure, capabilities, & infrastructure would be needed? :

Creation of a new mega-progam under USFA withiin the Department of Homeland Security.

More hiring, training, and salaries commensurate with CalFire model, i.e. "professionalization" of firefighting

A national firefighters union would likely emerge

A "soldier" model (versus science model) of firefighting

Most likely abandoning/weakening ESA, Clean Air Act, NEPA, and other legislation that currently required long-term planning and land management

Nationwide travel will end up being a requirement.

All incident model would be more likely, as firefighters are pulled for other disasters whenever needed.

What information could help mitigate the risks presented by this future? :

- Objective review and comparisons of salary/benefit/training models available in federal, state, local jurisdictions

- Study of most painless way for agency to facilitate/accept an employee union

- Public opinion (marketting-style) data on levels of fire/smoke tolerance vs. need to protect values

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Campaign: Future #1: Hot, Dry, and Out of Control

How did we get to hot, dry, out of control future?

- I think the trends of decreasing fuels treatments, decreasing fire suppression budgets, limited funding for adequate fire safety training and employee development, more homes in the WUI, and potential climate change led to this future.

- More uncoordinated private "fire protection" through insurance companies will add to firefighter risk and injury.

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

What information could help mitigate the risks presented by this future? :

- Accurate, credible models of what happens to fire activity and suppression costs as fuels treatments decline; and alternately, how investing in fuels treatments in specific areas would reduce fire behavior and decrease suppression risk and cost.

- Credible economic insurance models to determine what fire prevention/suppression costs or insurance costs should be borne by those benefiting: property owners, business owners on public lands, etc.

What information could help capitalize on opportunities presented by this future? :

- Business data on profits accrued/investment gains by public land users or property owners adjacent to public lands.

-Examining models from other countries on sharing fire prevention/ suppression responsibility and costs.

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Campaign: Future #2 – Super Fire Administration

FMO

Budgets.

FS using P-code savings when DOI can not, declining the DOI firefighting organization continually. Continuation of cross agency fires especially in the WUI environment with State and Private sector having, but not liking, to take more responsibility.

Submitted by (@tracyswenson)

What changes to strategy, organizational structure, capabilities, & infrastructure would be needed? :

Strategy would have to be geared towards better/more intense protection of values at risk. Values at risk would be more human based, like infrastructure, smoke impacts to large urban area's, and the WUI geographical regions particularly. No more timber, cheat grass, wildlife or land based values driving fire strategy/tactics.

Unfortunately IMO, we'd have to be more structured, likend to military or R5 organizationally. Probably still have regions but not necessarily what we have now.

What information could help mitigate the risks presented by this future? :

Explaining to line officers that they no longer lead the Fire program on a local basis. Show them the pro's and con's of this and TELL them not ask them if it's going to work. Resdide to the fact that the ones that have to experience the change will be unhappy until they are retired, and educate and incorporate the new line officers into the program as they come into place. This will also be important at the local and State GOV levels but don't have the experience to address that

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Campaign: "Wild Card" Issues

Fire is too important to be left to "fire people"

Fire "fighters" are not necessarily the best people to manage fire. Foresters, Range Conservationists, Ecologists, and other natural resource managers should take a more prominent role in managing the primary ecological disturbance agent in north american terrestrial ecosystems. Make fire management more accessible to professional natural resource managers and new college grads. The Incident Qualifications and Certification ...more »

Submitted by (@qpevrhy)

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Campaign: Technology and Program Infrastructure

Improved Data and Communication

One major hurdle that continues to exist in fire management is communication. We currently use radios to relay information, which relies on an accurate interpretation and a precise communication of a situation by a viewer as well as a clear understanding of that communication by the listener. Hopefully in the future, we can use devices that deliver real-time data about an environment directly to the fire management teams ...more »

Submitted by (@town83)

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Campaign: Changing Climatic Conditions Effects on Landscapes

Managing Environments for Resilience Now and into the Future

While Climate Change is certainly an important issue to plan for, it should not dominate or distract from the conversation on how to manage public lands in the future. Under current climatic conditions, we have mismanaged our forests and prairies. By aggressively suppressing fires and not allowing thinning projects to come to completion, we have allowed particular species to dominate their environments and our forests ...more »

Submitted by (@town83)

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Campaign: "Wild Card" Issues

Re-frame the WUI fire disaster problem

Instead of using the old orthodoxy, re-frame the problem by focusing the 'susceptibility of structures to the inevitability of wildfire exposure'. Create an organization and funding model that is independent of current wildfire control model to implement this fundamental paradigm shift in how we as a nation address this problem. There are too many negative feedback loops in the current system that continue to perpetuate ...more »

Submitted by (@hhaynes)

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Campaign: "Wild Card" Issues

Establish a High School program for Wildland Fire Ecology

Using the network of Fire Explorer programs nationwide, help us create a youth program that will both teach the wildland fire ecology and the urban interface constraints.

Submitted by (@michael.hall)

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Campaign: "Wild Card" Issues

Strengthen Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPPs) Standards

The CWPPs are plans that many communities rely upon to assess wildfire risk and vulnerabilities and act upon the information with well-informed strategies. There is some guidance as to how to develop the plans with approval at the State level. Some communities do well with them while others never create one. This lack of consistency with no national level guidance or review as to how to create and maintain the CWPP is ...more »

Submitted by (@brett.holt)

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Campaign: Technology and Program Infrastructure

ISR - Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance

After 30 years of military service it has become increasingly evident that in aviation one of the greatest things we can provide to anyone fighting is known in the military as intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR). Taking that forward to fighting wildfires and the problems and difficulties are very similar. The fog of war is smoke and the dangers operating on the ground are often similar. Situational ...more »

Submitted by (@deanattridge)

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Campaign: "Wild Card" Issues

Clearly defined Roles

The future of wildland fire “management” must include clear distinctions between the functions of a land management agency and the functions of an organization established for safe and effective suppression action. The past 15 years have ushered in an era of fuels management that has been of tremendous benefit for programmatic growth within the management agencies, but of dubious use for the intended purpose of reducing ...more »

Submitted by (@dluog.nhoj)

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