Future #3 – Resilient Landscapes

Healthy Future

- The agencies got wiser and more serious about educating the public and Congress for the long-term, rather than focusing on year-to-year funding issues. - Agencies engaged all sectors of society in supporting activities which lead to this healthy, rationale future. - Educated and every more vocal public began demanding more "fire prevention" (i.e. Rx fire) to check fire danger, perhaps even staging protests upon Congress, ...more »

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

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Future #2 – Super Fire Administration

Super Fire Administration

- A Congress that is increasingly divided and can only agree on simple, basic, short-term solutions in order to run the country. - Political interests/lobbyists protecting big business interests who pressure Congress to spend more and more money to protect their interests. - The reality of larger fires, climate change, public fears, and expectations the government must ensure safety and clean air at all times for all ...more »

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

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Future #1: Hot, Dry, and Out of Control

How did we get to hot, dry, out of control future?

- I think the trends of decreasing fuels treatments, decreasing fire suppression budgets, limited funding for adequate fire safety training and employee development, more homes in the WUI, and potential climate change led to this future.

- More uncoordinated private "fire protection" through insurance companies will add to firefighter risk and injury.

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

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Future #2 – Super Fire Administration

FMO

Budgets.

FS using P-code savings when DOI can not, declining the DOI firefighting organization continually. Continuation of cross agency fires especially in the WUI environment with State and Private sector having, but not liking, to take more responsibility.

Submitted by (@tracyswenson)

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"Wild Card" Issues

Fire is too important to be left to "fire people"

Fire "fighters" are not necessarily the best people to manage fire. Foresters, Range Conservationists, Ecologists, and other natural resource managers should take a more prominent role in managing the primary ecological disturbance agent in north american terrestrial ecosystems. Make fire management more accessible to professional natural resource managers and new college grads. The Incident Qualifications and Certification ...more »

Submitted by (@qpevrhy)

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Technology and Program Infrastructure

Improved Data and Communication

One major hurdle that continues to exist in fire management is communication. We currently use radios to relay information, which relies on an accurate interpretation and a precise communication of a situation by a viewer as well as a clear understanding of that communication by the listener. Hopefully in the future, we can use devices that deliver real-time data about an environment directly to the fire management teams ...more »

Submitted by (@town83)

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Changing Climatic Conditions Effects on Landscapes

Managing Environments for Resilience Now and into the Future

While Climate Change is certainly an important issue to plan for, it should not dominate or distract from the conversation on how to manage public lands in the future. Under current climatic conditions, we have mismanaged our forests and prairies. By aggressively suppressing fires and not allowing thinning projects to come to completion, we have allowed particular species to dominate their environments and our forests ...more »

Submitted by (@town83)

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"Wild Card" Issues

Re-frame the WUI fire disaster problem

Instead of using the old orthodoxy, re-frame the problem by focusing the 'susceptibility of structures to the inevitability of wildfire exposure'. Create an organization and funding model that is independent of current wildfire control model to implement this fundamental paradigm shift in how we as a nation address this problem. There are too many negative feedback loops in the current system that continue to perpetuate ...more »

Submitted by (@hhaynes)

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"Wild Card" Issues

Strengthen Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPPs) Standards

The CWPPs are plans that many communities rely upon to assess wildfire risk and vulnerabilities and act upon the information with well-informed strategies. There is some guidance as to how to develop the plans with approval at the State level. Some communities do well with them while others never create one. This lack of consistency with no national level guidance or review as to how to create and maintain the CWPP is ...more »

Submitted by (@brett.holt)

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Technology and Program Infrastructure

ISR - Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance

After 30 years of military service it has become increasingly evident that in aviation one of the greatest things we can provide to anyone fighting is known in the military as intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR). Taking that forward to fighting wildfires and the problems and difficulties are very similar. The fog of war is smoke and the dangers operating on the ground are often similar. Situational ...more »

Submitted by (@deanattridge)

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"Wild Card" Issues

Clearly defined Roles

The future of wildland fire “management” must include clear distinctions between the functions of a land management agency and the functions of an organization established for safe and effective suppression action. The past 15 years have ushered in an era of fuels management that has been of tremendous benefit for programmatic growth within the management agencies, but of dubious use for the intended purpose of reducing ...more »

Submitted by (@dluog.nhoj)

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