Future #1: Hot, Dry, and Out of Control

How did we get to hot, dry, out of control future?

- I think the trends of decreasing fuels treatments, decreasing fire suppression budgets, limited funding for adequate fire safety training and employee development, more homes in the WUI, and potential climate change led to this future.

- More uncoordinated private "fire protection" through insurance companies will add to firefighter risk and injury.

Submitted by (@karenmiranda)

Voting

2 votes
Active

Future #3 – Resilient Landscapes

Real Change is Possible

* Dept. of Education required the ecological benefits of fire to be part of the science core curriculum K – 12. * Universities added requirement to their undergraduate core curriculum that required credits in an environmental awareness or ecosystem management course that recognized fire’s role and benefits across our landscapes. * Corporations have adopted landscapes by funding and promoting positive ecological benefits ...more »

Submitted by (@iadtthmifm)

Voting

0 votes
Active

Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

Utilizing Private Industry to its capacity.

Would like to see a path developed to utilize the Professional Private industry in the roles of Type 1 Hand Crews as well as filling overhead positions. The capability is there but not currently being utilized. There is a concern about succession within the agencies, and the private industry could help fill this gap.

Submitted by (@nationalwildfiresuppressionassociation)

Voting

19 votes
Active

Future #2 – Super Fire Administration

Are these really the correct assumptions for Future #2?

If the scenario calls for a future super firefighting organization due to increasing wildfires and intense pressure to suppress to protect lives and communities. this does not necessarily imply a declining focus by the federal government on land management. Maybe it leads to an increasing role by states, tribes, communities, non-governmental organizations and private industry to increase their role in managing landscapes, ...more »

Submitted by (@gamlam1107)

Voting

1 vote
Active

Future #1: Hot, Dry, and Out of Control

Global Climate Shift, Fuels, and Humans

The trend has been a gradual shift or multiple variables gradually changing over time, but the climate and what we view in our surroundings work like a balanced beam. Everything in the natural world is a balance that is counteracted by something else. Because humans are such powerful and advanced organisms we are able to change that balance more drastically than any other organism. Once the balance starts to go one direction ...more »

Submitted by (@wmccrady)

Voting

0 votes
Active

"Wild Card" Issues

Clearly defined Roles

The future of wildland fire “management” must include clear distinctions between the functions of a land management agency and the functions of an organization established for safe and effective suppression action. The past 15 years have ushered in an era of fuels management that has been of tremendous benefit for programmatic growth within the management agencies, but of dubious use for the intended purpose of reducing ...more »

Submitted by (@dluog.nhoj)

Voting

0 votes
Active

"Wild Card" Issues

Re-frame the WUI fire disaster problem

Instead of using the old orthodoxy, re-frame the problem by focusing the 'susceptibility of structures to the inevitability of wildfire exposure'. Create an organization and funding model that is independent of current wildfire control model to implement this fundamental paradigm shift in how we as a nation address this problem. There are too many negative feedback loops in the current system that continue to perpetuate ...more »

Submitted by (@hhaynes)

Voting

2 votes
Active

Technology and Program Infrastructure

Paying for fuels reduction with a biomass market

First, we need to look at forest biomass as a renewable, clean energy source. Burning those doghair thickets of pine will release the same CO2 whether in a wildfire that threatens life and property, or in a smokestack with catalytic scrubbers and electric/heat generation. Second, we need to weigh the cost of fighting those wildfires versus the cost of thinning and hauling ladder fuels STRATEGICALLY within 100’ of existing ...more »

Submitted by (@aedean)

Voting

13 votes
Active

"Wild Card" Issues

Strengthen Community Wildfire Protection Plans (CWPPs) Standards

The CWPPs are plans that many communities rely upon to assess wildfire risk and vulnerabilities and act upon the information with well-informed strategies. There is some guidance as to how to develop the plans with approval at the State level. Some communities do well with them while others never create one. This lack of consistency with no national level guidance or review as to how to create and maintain the CWPP is ...more »

Submitted by (@brett.holt)

Voting

2 votes
Active

Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

We need a Paradigm Shift: Prepare, Stay, and Defend as a viable option

The challenge of increased wildland fires impacting human communities requires a dramatic paradigm shift in how wildland urban interface (WUI) residents are viewed and what is expected of them. The failed paradigm of WUI residents as helpless victims of fire must be completely banished. In the new paradigm, WUI residents will be highly pro-active participants in protecting their homes and their lives. All WUI residents ...more »

Submitted by (@julierogers03)

Voting

12 votes
Active

Evolving Risk in Public and Firefighter Safety

Critical Site Universal Blueprint

Interface Dwellers and Fire Fighters should understand how to strategically position all critical sites, where 1. All vegetation is converted to a shaded fuel break 200' around that which is to be protected. Trees thinned to have 25' space between crowns; pruned of ladder fuels up 12 feet high. 2. That there be 3 permanent circular control lines. First one 6 to 10 feet completely around structure. 2nd control line two ...more »

Submitted by (@troop.dragonslayers)

Voting

0 votes
Active